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Meals That Can Boost Your Metabolism

Meals That Can Boost Your Metabolism


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Burn some extra calories with these spicy recipes

Capsaicin-rich peppers are great metabolism boosters.


This coffee- and cayenne-rubbed steak is cooked on the grill, but, if you don’t have one (or it’s too cold to grill outdoors), you can make the steak indoors on a cast-iron grill pan.
Click here for the recipe.

Chile-Honey-Glazed Salmon


This spicy glazed salmon is one of the tastiest ways to kick your metabolism into high gear. It has jalapeños, chipotle, and chili powder.
Click here for the recipe.


There’s no better way to use chile peppers than in a rich and spicy mole. This pork mole stew calls for whole guajillo chiles; make sure you soak the them long enough that they become soft and easy to purée.
Click here with the recipe.

Seared Tuna with Brown Rice


(Credit: Thinkstock)
Nutty, chewy brown rice, spicy wasabi paste, and crunchy daikon are the perfect complement to seared tuna. This healthy version of a Japanese favorite is as delicious as it is good for you.
Click here for the recipe.

Kristie Collado is The Daily Meal’s Cook Editor. Follow her on Twitter @KColladoCook.


30 Metabolism Boosting Foods That Will Help You Burn Fat

Losing weight and metabolism works hand in hand. This is the reason why health providers recommend boosting metabolism to achieve success in losing weight. Metabolism is the effects of different biochemical processes that happen in your body.

Many people who want to shed extra pounds are more concern about metabolism. Proper metabolism gives the energy your body needs throughout the day.

If your metabolism is functioning properly you can expect that the risks of developing diseases are at bay. Otherwise, you can experience metabolic disorder.

In the same manner, metabolism is also associated to low immunity. This means that if your metabolism is low there’s great possibility of developing depression, headaches, flu, cold, belly problems and weight gain (1).

Through metabolism, the foods you ate were converted into energy. It involves two steps including anabolism and catabolism.

Boosting your metabolism is not a magic. It’s important to know the proper way of enhancing your metabolism to avoid aggravating the issue. Click here for a Metabolism Calculator.

Increasing your metabolism means preserving the needed muscles while losing weight. But, it makes sense to normalize your metabolism naturally by following healthy diet and lifestyle.

You should not consider taking stimulants or artificial supplements to power up your metabolism. Keep in mind that using stimulants can negatively impact your metabolism and other parts of the body like your thyroid.

Even healthy eating isn’t enough to boost your metabolism. In fact, it only shows little effect on the metabolic rate. The good news is that there are certain foods that can help your body in producing energy and burning fat as well.


5 Spices to Boost Your Metabolism

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5 Spices to Boost Your Metabolism

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The Power Five

Eating right coupled with daily sweat-drenching workouts is a surefire way of making your metabolism run. But sprinkling a few spices to your muscle-building meals can give your metabolism a boost that it needs. Keep in mind, seasoning dishes is not a short cut to a speedy metabolism, but research has shown that incorporating specific compounds from spices can help increase your calorie-burning and fat-loss potential. Transform not only your food, but your body as well by incorporating these five spices.

Cayenne

Cayenne pepper can kick your metabolism into high gear because of capsaicin – the active compound in cayenne pepper, which causes the burning sensation in your mouth upon consumption. Capsaicin is widely known and studied for its thermogenic effect – its ability to generate extra body heat (and those beads of sweat on your forehead) and raise the metabolic rate. Research has indicated that the thermogenesis from capsaicin may increase your metabolism by up to five percent, even more so within a few hours of following a meal. Also, it has been seen to increase fat oxidation by up to 16 percent, allowing the body to actively burn fat.Tip: Pack a punch of flavor by seasoning fish with a cayenne spice blend. You can also add it to roasted nuts for a spicy protein-packed snack, or spice up your love life by making cayenne and cocoa-dusted dark chocolates. Also, try this smoothie that has a kick.

Ginger

You may be most familiar with the wet, salmon-colored ginger served next to your sushi. Ginger can actually be found in many places — crystallized in candies, infused in ginger ale, fresh in the produce section, and dried in your spice cabinet. It has a pungent flavor and is most commonly used to alleviate nausea and digestive issues due to ginger being an antioxidant powerhouse with numerous pharmacological properties. Its use as a metabolism-booster comes from the active compound called gingerol, which is a relative to capsaicin, the active ingredient in chili peppers. Recent research conducted on overweight men concluded that ginger consumption enhanced thermogenesis – the production of body heat as food is metabolized in the body. Animal studies have also suggested that including ginger in the diet can increase metabolism, in addition to enhancing fat digestion and absorption.Tip: Infuse boiling water with fresh ginger, or simply add ginger powder to hot water to rev up your metabolism. You can also grate fresh ginger into a stir-fry, or add ginger powder to marinades. SEE ALSO: Recipe Of The Month: Protein-Packed, Honey-Ginger Venison

Turmeric

Turmeric is a botanical relative to ginger and is often a component of curry powder and a staple in Indian cuisine. Curcumin is the main active component of the golden spice – containing powerful anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties that may help combat and/or prevent heart disease, cancer, depression, and age-related neurodegenerative diseases. While presently recognized only in animal studies, the metabolism-boosting and weight-loss effects from consuming curcumin look promising. Research has suggested that regular consumption of curcumin may reduce weight gain and total body fat by directly decreasing levels of insulin and leptin resistance – factors linked heavily to weight gain.Tip: Add turmeric powder to a soup, rice dish, or frittata. Also toss it with roasted vegetable, or blend fresh turmeric root into a smoothie for a golden hue of metabolism-boosting goodness!SEE ALSO: The 10-Minute Turmeric Tea

Cinnamon

A staple in most pantries, cinnamon can do more for your body than stimulate your senses when chowing down on baked goods. Recently, cinnamon has been in the spotlight for helping individuals with type 2 diabetes in reducing glucose, triglycerides, “bad” cholesterol, and total cholesterol, as well as improve blood pressure. It’s underlying mechanism of action stems from its ability to imitate and enhance the activity of insulin by helping move glucose into cells. This explains cinnamon’s impact on your metabolism – helping your body process sugar more efficiently, making it less likely to be stored as fat. Tip: Sprinkle cinnamon on air-popped popcorn, apple slices, or Greek yogurt for a healthy, sweet treat, or combine it with cayenne powder to make a metabolism-revving Mexican hot cocoa.

Cumin

Cumin is an extremely popular spice used in cuisines throughout the world, but many Americans only recognize it when diving into a bowl of chili. Though not as widely studied for its metabolism-boosting effects as the other spices discussed, recent research on overweight women concluded that daily cumin consumption reduced blood levels of fasting cholesterol, triglycerides, and “bad” cholesterol and increased HDL or “good” cholesterol levels. Weight, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, and fat mass were also significantly reduced. The reason: Cumin contains phytosterols – plant compounds known to inhibit absorption of cholesterol in the body. Researchers also speculated that cumin decreased body weight due to a temporary increase in metabolic rate, similar to that produced by hot spices. Tip: Use cumin powder in curries, soups, spice rubs, or taco seasonings, or add it to a to turkey chili for a healthy, hearty meal.

The Power Five

Eating right coupled with daily sweat-drenching workouts is a surefire way of making your metabolism run. But sprinkling a few spices to your muscle-building meals can give your metabolism a boost that it needs. Keep in mind, seasoning dishes is not a short cut to a speedy metabolism, but research has shown that incorporating specific compounds from spices can help increase your calorie-burning and fat-loss potential. Transform not only your food, but your body as well by incorporating these five spices.

Cayenne

Cayenne pepper can kick your metabolism into high gear because of capsaicin – the active compound in cayenne pepper, which causes the burning sensation in your mouth upon consumption. Capsaicin is widely known and studied for its thermogenic effect – its ability to generate extra body heat (and those beads of sweat on your forehead) and raise the metabolic rate. Research has indicated that the thermogenesis from capsaicin may increase your metabolism by up to five percent, even more so within a few hours of following a meal. Also, it has been seen to increase fat oxidation by up to 16 percent, allowing the body to actively burn fat.

Tip: Pack a punch of flavor by seasoning fish with a cayenne spice blend. You can also add it to roasted nuts for a spicy protein-packed snack, or spice up your love life by making cayenne and cocoa-dusted dark chocolates.

Ginger

You may be most familiar with the wet, salmon-colored ginger served next to your sushi. Ginger can actually be found in many places — crystallized in candies, infused in ginger ale, fresh in the produce section, and dried in your spice cabinet. It has a pungent flavor and is most commonly used to alleviate nausea and digestive issues due to ginger being an antioxidant powerhouse with numerous pharmacological properties. Its use as a metabolism-booster comes from the active compound called gingerol, which is a relative to capsaicin, the active ingredient in chili peppers. Recent research conducted on overweight men concluded that ginger consumption enhanced thermogenesis – the production of body heat as food is metabolized in the body. Animal studies have also suggested that including ginger in the diet can increase metabolism, in addition to enhancing fat digestion and absorption.

Tip: Infuse boiling water with fresh ginger, or simply add ginger powder to hot water to rev up your metabolism. You can also grate fresh ginger into a stir-fry, or add ginger powder to marinades.

Turmeric

Turmeric is a botanical relative to ginger and is often a component of curry powder and a staple in Indian cuisine. Curcumin is the main active component of the golden spice – containing powerful anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties that may help combat and/or prevent heart disease, cancer, depression, and age-related neurodegenerative diseases. While presently recognized only in animal studies, the metabolism-boosting and weight-loss effects from consuming curcumin look promising. Research has suggested that regular consumption of curcumin may reduce weight gain and total body fat by directly decreasing levels of insulin and leptin resistance – factors linked heavily to weight gain.

Tip: Add turmeric powder to a soup, rice dish, or frittata. Also toss it with roasted vegetable, or blend fresh turmeric root into a smoothie for a golden hue of metabolism-boosting goodness!

Cinnamon

A staple in most pantries, cinnamon can do more for your body than stimulate your senses when chowing down on baked goods. Recently, cinnamon has been in the spotlight for helping individuals with type 2 diabetes in reducing glucose, triglycerides, “bad” cholesterol, and total cholesterol, as well as improve blood pressure. It’s underlying mechanism of action stems from its ability to imitate and enhance the activity of insulin by helping move glucose into cells. This explains cinnamon’s impact on your metabolism – helping your body process sugar more efficiently, making it less likely to be stored as fat.

Tip: Sprinkle cinnamon on air-popped popcorn, apple slices, or Greek yogurt for a healthy, sweet treat, or combine it with cayenne powder to make a metabolism-revving Mexican hot cocoa.

Cumin

Cumin is an extremely popular spice used in cuisines throughout the world, but many Americans only recognize it when diving into a bowl of chili. Though not as widely studied for its metabolism-boosting effects as the other spices discussed, recent research on overweight women concluded that daily cumin consumption reduced blood levels of fasting cholesterol, triglycerides, and “bad” cholesterol and increased HDL or “good” cholesterol levels. Weight, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, and fat mass were also significantly reduced. The reason: Cumin contains phytosterols – plant compounds known to inhibit absorption of cholesterol in the body. Researchers also speculated that cumin decreased body weight due to a temporary increase in metabolic rate, similar to that produced by hot spices.

Tip: Use cumin powder in curries, soups, spice rubs, or taco seasonings, or add it to a to turkey chili for a healthy, hearty meal.


A common theme in this list is a lot of the choices high in protein, and that is because these types of foods are harder for your body to digest, which makes it use more calories.

These types of food also make you full longer suppressing your appetite and making it possible for you to consume fewer calories during the day.

Whey protein is one of the most beneficial of them all due to its absorption rate being at 97%, and this means that almost all of the whey protein you consume will be used in your body.

It can also be easily consumed in a drink, smoothie, or a shake.


3. Tropical Treat Smoothie

This one has so many yummy tropical fruits that you may just want to enjoy one every day.

While it does help to boost your metabolism, it also has Vitamins A and C and zinc so it helps to boost your immune system as well.

  • ½ cup cantaloupe &ndash cubed
  • ½ cup mango &ndash cubed
  • ¼ cup pumpkin seeds &ndashfinely chopped
  • ½ cup pineapple &ndash cubed
  • Enough water to thin &ndash again, this is dependent on how thin or thick you want your drink.

Just blend all of the ingredients together and enjoy.
Photo credit Pinterest.


5. Opt for Organic

Though buying organic groceries is more expensive, it might be worth it if you're trying to boost your metabolism. By eating organic, you can avoid harmful pesticides and herbicides found in our food supply that can adversely affect your health, including metabolism, says Dr. Gedroic.

A growing body of research is linking chemicals in our environment — like pollutants and pesticides — to weight gain. Indeed, according to a May 2016 article published in Environmental Health Perspectives, environmental contaminants can disrupt metabolic functions and contribute to obesity.

One of the most pervasive chemicals is glyphosate, says Dr. Gedroic. Found in herbicides, glyphosate disturbs the balance of beneficial gut microbes, leading to chronic inflammation, and interrupts the proper functioning of glycine, a critical amino acid that's involved in maintaining a healthy metabolic rate.


Almonds are packed with fiber, protein, and healthy fats. These nutrients can help you burn calories and manage your weight.

Low carb veggies that are full of nutrients are important for boosting metabolism. They help keep the body as a whole healthy and running as efficiently as possible.


13 Herbs And Spices Scientifically Proven To Help You Lose Weight

If your idea of the perfect weight loss meal is plain chicken or fish with a salad and brown rice, then you're missing out on some major ingredients shown by reams of research to help the body burn fat: herbs and spices.

Herbs and spices are the best way to add flavor to food for no extra calories, sugar, sodium, or other junk&mdashwhich is critical to do when you're trying to lose weight. Why? It's pretty simple: Research shows that if you don't like the taste of what you eat, you're much less likely to stick to any diet, no matter how disciplined you are. Herbs and spices add a significant amount of flavor to food and can turn, for example, that piece of plain chicken into a restaurant-worthy meal, thanks to just a little rosemary, paprika, sea salt, and ground pepper. (Lose up to 15 pounds WITHOUT dieting with Eat Clean to Get Lean, our 21-day clean-eating meal plan.)

What's more, many herbs and spices can actually boost your metabolism and help your body burn fat more quickly. Here, 13 herbs and spices with science-backed powers to help you lose all the weight you want in the New Year:

This brightly colored yellow spice may help your body burn fat, according to a 2009 study from Tufts University that found that mice fed curcumin&mdashthe active ingredient in turmeric&mdashlost more fat than those on the same diet with no curcumin. A "warming spice," turmeric increases body heat, which, in turn, can boost metabolism. The spice also has a host of other health benefits, from helping fight Alzheimer's disease to keeping hormones in check during "that time of the month." Try adding turmeric to soups or stews or sprinkle over roasted veggies or nuts.

This classic holiday spice has been shown to balance blood sugar, helping to curb cravings and keep you feeling full for longer. While you might already sprinkle some cinnamon in oatmeal, you can increase your daily intake by mixing the spice in cottage cheese, plain yogurt, or your favorite brew to make a more fragrant tea (and many more things!). Cinnamon also makes a great addition to savory spice rubs and marinades for meat.

Cayenne
If you've ever accidently added too much of this to foods, then you know that cayenne is a warming spice in a big, bad, major way. This means that, similar to turmeric, cayenne raises body temp, helping to boost metabolism. In fact, adding the spice to food can help you burn up to 100 calories per meal, according to Lauren Minchen, RD. Try sprinkling ground cayenne on roasted nuts or in soups, scrambled eggs, or homemade dressings or dips for an extra kick.

Cumin is the little spice that could: Just one teaspoon added to one of your meals per day can help you burn up to three times more body fat, according to a recent study conducted on overweight women. That's great news, especially since cumin is so universal, great for adding flavor to almost any food. Try it in everything from soups, stews, dressings, and dips to stir-fries, rubs, marinades, and even flatbreads and other savory baked goods. (Check out these foods that burn belly fat faster.)

Like cinnamon, ginger helps control blood sugar, meaning it can help prevent a spike in your glucose levels after a sugar- or carb-rich meal. The spice also has the same fat-burning, or thermogenic, properties as turmeric and cayenne, according to Barbara Mendez, RPH, MS, an integrative nutritionist in New York City. Grate fresh ginger into stir-fries, over baked fish, or into fruit salad or tea.

Garlic
It may cause stinky breath, but eating more of this herb can help your body burn fat, according to a study that found that mice on a diet with garlic lost more weight in 7 weeks than mice without it. While the results haven't been proven in humans, there's definitely no harm in adding more to your meals. If nothing else, the pungent herb makes food tastier, especially when you opt for raw garlic, which also has more good-for-you nutrients. (And don't throw out your sprouted garlic either.)

Black Pepper

Like ginger, black pepper boasts plenty of fat-burning properties. The spice has also been shown to block the formation of new fat cells, Mendez says, which can help prevent weight gain in the first place. If you don't already, try adding black pepper to just about everything you eat&mdashit's even great in traditionally sweetened foods like yogurt, cottage cheese, and oatmeal.

Cardamom
Cardamom is another one of those thermogenic spices, meaning it helps boost body temp and metabolism. A favorite in Indian cuisine, cardamom is fantastic mixed with nutmeg, cinnamon, cloves, and ginger for a homemade curry blend or chai tea. You can also try adding some of this citrusy spice to baked goods, coffee, or gamey meats like lamb.

Dandelions
While many gardeners consider dandelion a pesky weed, the plant is becoming more popular among chefs and home cooks as a nutritious way to add flavor to meals and drinks. As it turns out, the "weed" has some weight loss benefits, too, helping to reduce bloat while increasing your intake of vitamins like A, C, and E, along with minerals like iron and potassium.


Don’t Throw Away Your Strawberry Tops! They Can Ease Arthritis, Boost Metabolism, and Lower Blood Pressure

After washing them, what’s the first thing you do when you’re prepping a batch of delicious strawberries? Whether you’re turning them into a topping for shortcakes or eating them fresh on their own, the strawberry leaves and tops tend to get lopped off and tossed in the trash. However, you might want to hold onto those often discarded pieces next time. It turns out, they’re totally edible — and super healthy!

According to Dawn Combs from Mockingbird Meadows Farm in Ohio, strawberry leaves have been used in traditional medicine for years as an arthritis remedy, digestion aid, and metabolism booster. She adds that in Germany, their official medical advisory board claims they are “supportive therapy for respiratory, nervous, and circulatory systems.”

The experts at StrawberryPlants.org (which lives up to its claim as the “one stop for everything related to strawberry plants and growing strawberries”) also say that herbal remedies made from the leaves, stems, and flowers are believed to help with countless ailments. The long list includes “diarrhea, gout, kidney stones, bad breath, throat infections, fevers, inflammatory conditions, fainting, melancholy or depression, and diseases of the blood, spleen, and liver.”

This is all based on anecdotal evidence passed down through generations, but is likely linked to the fact that strawberry leaves are known to contain high levels of anti-inflammatory agents and antioxidants. A 2016 review of studies concluded that consuming these and other types of berry leaves (like blueberries) may promote healthy function throughout the body.

Nutritionist Lily Souther told Nottingham Post, “It’s important to note that as leaves become older, the [antioxidant] value decreases, so the leaves of fresh strawberries are likely to provide the highest antioxidant value.” She also mentioned some more promising studies: One that found certain polyphenols in strawberry leaves were potentially protective against harmful microbes and another that observed improved blood flow and blood pressure-lowering benefits. Souther adds that more research needs to be done, but this is a pretty great start!

Of course, even after learning all about all those perks, we understand if the leafy tops of strawberries don’t sound super appetizing. Luckily, there are some creative ways to use them that avoid any unpleasant texture or bitter taste. (Just remember to give them a good cleaning first.)

If you’re someone who loves strawberries in your smoothies, simply add the whole thing to your blender instead of trimming them. The fruity pulp (and other ingredients) will take the flavor foreground while the strawberry leaves sneak in the background with their nutrients.

When you do chop the tops off, save them to infuse in water for a refreshing summer sip! You can also let them hang out in a bottle of white vinegar with a dash of sugar for a fruity twist that tastes great splashed onto salads.

Whichever way you use them, you’ll be cutting down food waste and giving yourself a healthy boost!


Can you boost your metabolism?

Your metabolism is the process your body uses to make and burn energy from food. You rely on your metabolism to breathe, think, digest, circulate blood, keep warm in the cold, and stay cool in the heat.

It is a common belief that raising your metabolism helps you burn more calories and increase weight loss. Unfortunately, there are more myths about boosting metabolism than tactics that work. Some myths can backfire. If you think you are burning more calories than you actually are, you could end up eating more than you should.

Here are the facts on 6 metabolism myths.

Myth #1: Exercise boosts your metabolism long after you stop.

It is true that you burn more calories when you exercise, especially when you get your heart rate up with activities like biking or swimming.

That increased calorie burn lasts as long as your workout. You might keep burning extra calories for an hour or so after that, but the aftereffects of exercise stop there. Once you stop moving, your metabolism will go back to its resting rate.

If you load up on calories after a workout, thinking your body will keep burning calories the rest of the day, you risk weight gain.

What to do: Exercise for your health and refuel with healthy foods. Do not let exercise give you an excuse to overindulge in high-calorie foods and drinks.

Myth #2: Adding muscle will help you lose weight.

Muscle burns more calories than fat. So will building more muscle not boost your metabolism? Yes, but only by a small amount. Most regular exercisers only gain a few pounds (kilograms) of muscle. That is not enough to make a big difference in the number of calories you burn. Plus, when not in active use, muscles burn very few calories. Most of the time, your brain, heart, kidneys, liver, and lungs account for most of your metabolism.

What to do: Lift weights for stronger bones and muscles. Make strength training part of a well-rounded exercise program that includes activities to get your heart pumping. To keep off extra weight, you also need to eat a healthy diet and appropriate portions.

Myth #3: Eating certain foods can boost your metabolism.

Eating foods like green tea, caffeine, or hot chili peppers will not help you shed excess pounds (kilograms). Some may provide a small boost in your metabolism, but not enough to make a difference in your weight.

What to do: Choose foods for their good nutrition and taste. Eat a variety of healthy foods that fill you up without filling you out.

Myth #4: Eating small meals during the day increases your metabolism.

Unfortunately, there is little scientific evidence that eating small, frequent meals boosts metabolism.

Spreading your meals throughout the day might keep you from getting too hungry and overeating. If so, it is a good idea. Athletes perform better when they eat more often in smaller amounts. If you are someone who has a hard time stopping once you start eating, 3 meals a day may make it easier for you to stick to an appropriate intake than lots of little snacks.

What to do: Pay attention to your hunger cues and eat when you feel hungry. Keep track of your daily diet and limit high-sugar, high-fat snacks.

Myth #5: Getting a full night's sleep is good for your metabolism.

A good night's sleep will not boost your metabolism but going without sleep can add pounds. Sleep-deprived people tend to eat more calories than they need, possibly to deal with feeling tired.

What to do: Plan your life so you have enough time for sleep. If you have trouble sleeping, look into ways to unwind before bedtime and make your bedroom comfortable for sleep. Talk to your health care provider if self-care tips for better sleep do not help.

Myth# 6: You will gain weight as you age because your metabolism slows down.

While it is true that our metabolism is slower than when we were kids, a lot of mid-life weight gain happens because we become less active. Jobs and family push exercise to the back burner. When we do not move as much, we lose muscle and gain fat.

As you get older, you may also have trouble regulating your meals with age. After a big meal, younger people tend to eat less until their bodies use up the calories. This natural appetite control seems to fade as people get older. Unless you pay close attention, big meals can quickly add up.

What to do: As you get older, it is important to make exercise a regular part of every day. By staying active and sticking with smaller portions of healthy foods, you can ward off weight gain as you age.